History

Paying Tribute

July 14, 2001
Looking for a monumental way to show gratitude for dedicated public service, Lower Milford Township emergency personnel hit upon the idea of dedicating a monument.
In doing so, members in July held a ceremony to dedicate a memorial to pay tribute to all who have serve the fire company in its 60-year existence of offering fire and ambulance service to Lower Milford and surrounding communities.

The memorial has several components. The flagpole in the center holds the national and state flags donated by state Sen. James Gerlach and state Rep. Jane Baker. The black train wheel symbolizes the clanging device used to notify firefighters of emergencies before sirens existed. The fireman statue stands ever vigilant and ready to assist. And, the inscribed monument obtained through Quakertown Memorials notes the appreciation of service by emergency personnel who assisted their community.

Although the emergency responders are more used to giving than receiving, they decided the time was right to honor those who have served their community. Erecting the memorial in front of the station at 1601 Limeport Pike seemed appropriate.

The effort was spurred by memorial funds for three active members: Brand Krueger, Eugene Hrebin and Alfred Schell. Members from each of the three families participated in the ceremony.
Ambulance Capt. and Recording Secretary Edna Scheifele led the ceremony, which began with a presentation of the colors by Boy Scout Troop 334 of Chestnut Hill Church. A ribbon-cutting followed.

It is hoped that residents will view the memorial as an attractive reminder of the efforts of so many, both in the past and present. It also should remind that more volunteers are needed to answer the call, both in this generation and the next. In short, July 12, 2001 not only served as a tribute date to dedicate the monument, but as a monumental tribute to the dedicated.

Refurbishment makes 1984 Mini-Pumper as Good as New

February 9, 2001
The sparkling red and white Pierce mini-pumper was our pride and joy when it arrived in 1984.Seventeen years later it is as good as new – literally. The $40,000 truck made quite a splash at the Lancaster County Fire Expo soon after its delivery. And, Pierce Manufacturing, Inc. of Appleton, Wis., thought highly enough of it to feature the truck in its sales brochure. But the most compelling evidence of success is that after more than 15 years the truck was worth making as good as new through refurbishment. Yes, this Pierce was classified a mini-pumper at a pump rating of 300 gallons per minute. But equally important has been its ability to douse brush fires in rural Lower Milford Township with its sprawling acres of farm fields.

Long a leader in properly tackling brush fires in our region, Lower Milford was the first in the area to add a brush truck in 1966 with the purchase of a converted 1959 Chevrolet Apache brush truck from a Maryland military base.

Lower Milford, as well as surrounding departments, quickly found the value of employing this vehicle in the fight against stubborn field and woods fires. Besides the Indian tanks and rakes on board, firefighters employed the ground sweeps necessary to flood flames at ground level.

As proof of the effectiveness, Lower Milford made certain this feature was added when members replaced the Chevrolet in 1984. The Pierce has continued the tradition of serving as a specialty piece. Although small in water-carrying capacity, it remains a piece that can enter tight quarters with strong firepower in addition to its brush capabilities.

But time moves on and rejuvenation and upgrading are necessary. Lower Milford invested $14,000 last year to replace worn components and update others to earn this unit a 2000 National Fire Protection Association rating.

It might have been tempting to shop for a new, more trendy piece, but Lower Milford firefighters knew a good thing when they saw it under their own roof – combining wisdom with thriftiness to update the Pierce. They paid the upgrade price and avoided the nearly $100,000 sticker shock.